Female Native American Storytelling: Female Storytellers in Native culture. Presence in Contemporary Native American Literature. Leslie Marmon Silko

Authors

  • Ana Belén Pérez García Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia (UNED) (Spain)

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.17561/grove.v0i22.2701

Abstract

The role of Native American women has been extensively debated. Much has been said about their relationship with men and their relevance within the tribe. One of the most important tasks they had was that of storytellers. Storytelling is one of the pillars of Native American culture since it helped to transmit their values and folklore and keep them alive and that is why women’s role as storytellers is fundamental for the survival of the tribe. Although this role has often been shared with men, it seems that the relationship of women with storytelling is more complex, valuable and relevant than that of men. This is shown in their characterization in traditional Native American myths or in the fact that old traditional Native American women and storytellers became the source of inspiration of many contemporary writers, such as Silko, Erdrich or Allen, who took them as models for their novels. Silko exemplifies with her novels Almanac of the Dead and Ceremony this fundamental role of Native Women and the influence they had on her life and writing.

Keywords: Native American women, storytelling, storytellers, Leslie Marmon Silko.

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Published

2015-12-16

How to Cite

Pérez García, A. B. (2015). Female Native American Storytelling: Female Storytellers in Native culture. Presence in Contemporary Native American Literature. Leslie Marmon Silko. The Grove - Working Papers on English Studies, 22. https://doi.org/10.17561/grove.v0i22.2701